Crystallizations of crystalline candies

Crystalline candies have an organized sugar structure that is formed through the process of crystallization. Crystalline candies such as fudge or fondant are smooth, creamy and easily chewed.

Crystallization is a complex process with many interrelate factors. The nature of the crystallizing substance is important of crystallization. The rate of crystallization is the speed at which nuclei grow into crystals.

Crystalline candies are evaluated on their smoothness. The sugar crystals are so tiny that they cannot be felt by the tongue.

One of the factors influencing the smoothness of crystalline candies is the point when crystallization begins. If crystals are formed very rapidly, the candy will become locked into a fine crystalline structure that will change very little over time.

When making candy, it is important to use a pan with even heating characteristics to ensure accurate, even temperature readings. A small error of 1 to 2 degrees below the correct temperature will cause the candy to be too soft; conversely cooking at 1 to 2 degrees above the required temperature will create a crumbly or hard product.

In order to control the rate of crystallization and the formation of small crystals and to ensure a smooth texture, interfering agents are incorporated into a sugar formulation. Chemical interfering agents produce invert sugar (glucose and fructose), thereby slowing crystallization and increasing the solubility of solute.
Crystallizations of crystalline candies
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FOOD SCIENCE AND HUMAN NUTRITION